Posts Tagged ‘ book ’

By The Time We Got To Woodstock . . .

. . . we were roughly fifty strong. I’m speaking of course about the Woodstock Literary Festival, where Helena Attlee was ‘in conversation’ with Victoria Summerley of The Independent, talking about our latest production, Italy’s Private Gardens, (out in a couple of weeks). The interview went well – you can read one blogger’s views here.

helena attlee

Helena faces the gentlemen of the Press

It was a bit of a race to get to Woodstock, as the previous day we had driven back from a brief holiday in the Limousin – river swimming through autumnal woods and much reading.

starry night on the Creuse

Garden photography for the next book is starting to wind down, though not quite complete yet. I paid a flying visit to the Eden Project this week (horrible grey light and drizzle, sadly), Northern Ireland next and hope for a brilliant autumn to finish. (Though perhaps we won’t get one this year – don’t we need late summer heat to produce good leaf colour?)

Biome at the Eden Project

The Eden Project

dahlias

tidying up at Wisley

Finally, a film to recommend – Morris, A Life With Bells On. Very funny indeed, whether you love or hate this most peculiar of English customs.

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Journey to the Bottom Left Hand Corner

To the Isles of Scilly last week, to shoot the Abbey Garden on Tresco. We took the ferry this time, in preference to the helicopter, to try to get some small sense of the isolation of these islands. After 35 miles of heaving grey-green sea and ditto passengers, you’re impressed by the determination of the Victorian garden visitors who travelled this way in huge numbers, and (at first) by sail.The Scillonian ferryThe islands were as beautiful as ever. Thick fog and drizzle had shrouded much of our journey from the mainland (and grounded the helicopter), but to our huge relief it cleared soon after our arrival, and dazzling Scillonian weather made its appearance.

rainbow over samson

Clearing weather over Samson

The garden looked great, a skilfully managed profusion of plants from both hemispheres. It’s the only place I know where agapanthus is considered a weed – it has spread itself across the dunes, where it looks amazing against silvery marram grass and the turquoise seas.

agapanthus on tresco

Agapanthus on the dunes

tresco abbey garden

The middle terrace

leucadendron argenteum

Leucadendron argenteum, the Cape Silver Tree

And finally, today saw the delivery of advance copies of Italy’s Private Gardens (actual publication date is the 7th October). A pleasure and a relief to see it at last – only elephants, I think, gestate for longer than publishers. In any event Frances Lincoln have made a beautiful job of it, as always, and Helena and I are delighted.

Time flies

As usual, I don’t know where the time has gone since my last post at the back end of May. Work on the Great Gardens of Britain continues frantically as green turns to brown across much of the country. There was another trip north in June taking in three utterly different and remarkable gardens. First was Levens Hall in Cumbria, famous for its deeply peculiar topiary. This really demands to be photographed by moonlight – I’ll try to time my next visit appropriately.

Levens Hall, Cumbria

Levens Hall

Next to Dumfries and Charles Jencks’ extraordinary Garden of Cosmic Speculation, which rewrites the history of the cosmos and of the evolution of consciousness in terms of landscape. Quite unlike anything I’ve ever seen before. From a photographer’s point of view it needs to be seen in brilliant light – we had one perfect evening, but cloud the next morning, so that’s also a return trip.

The Garden of Cosmic Speculation

The Snake Mound and the Snail Mound

Then north-east to Ian Hamilton Finlay’s Little Sparta in the Pentland Hills, a garden deeply rooted in the wider European culture, filled with quotation and wordplay.

Other news; The Gardens of Japan continues to do well, with a German edition also now due. More excellent reviews, too: from the lovely and deeply mourned Elspeth Thompson in the May edition of The World of Interiors, from David Wheeler in House & Garden and from Jake Hobson in Topiarius. Saving Churches by Matthew Saunders, is now out and contains quite a lot of my work (see below). The churches were an absolute joy to visit and work in – long may the charity (The Friends of Friendless Churches) thrive.

St Baglan, Llanfaglan

St Baglan, Llanfaglan

Old St Luke's, Milland, Sussex

No Such Thing As A Free Launch

Well, that’s got The Gardens of Japan off to a good start. A hundred or so friends, family and acqaintances came and made a determined attempt to drink us dry in the intervals of saying nice things to Helena and I about the book. They bought a copy or three as well, I’m relieved to say. David & Sara Bamford generously offered us their beautiful new cafe and gallery as a location for the launch and the accompanying small exhibition. A very good evening altogether, and we even managed, just, to cover the cost of putting it on. Gone, alas,  are the glory days when books went hurtling down the slipway awash with the publisher’s champagne.

Book launch

some of the multitude

If you missed it, the exhibition is on until May 2nd at The Workhouse Gallery, Presteigne, LD8 2UF (01544 267864). Opening hours are 10 – 4 from Tuesday to Saturday, 12 – 4 on Sundays, closed Mondays. Copies of the book are also on sale, as are some of Jake Hobson‘s beautiful Japanese gardening implements. Oh, and if you’ve seen the book – and like it – we’d be grateful for a brief review or rating on Amazon. Thanks!

Our glamorous girls man the bar

A new feature – the Telegraph Magazine, Saturday 6th March

Ginkaku-ji Temple

The gravel garden at Ginkaku-ji, Kyoto

In tomorrow’s Telegraph Magazine, extracts and pictures from The Gardens of Japan. Just a taster – I’m afraid you still have to buy the book, which is published on the 25th March. Visit and support your local independent bookseller for choice, but if like us you’re miles from anywhere, you can always get it from guess who (link on the book cover below)
The Gardens of Japan

The Gardens of Japan – first review

Our first review for The Gardens of Japan, and we really couldn’t ask for a better one. It’s in the current (March) issue of Gardens Illustrated and is by Charles Quest-Ritson, to whom all thanks. “Ravishingly beautiful and inspirational” – yes, we can live with that. Official publication date is the 25th March, though some bookshops already seem to have stock.

Ryoan-ji Temple, Kyoto

A weeping cherry overhangs the famous ochre wall at Ryoan-ji Temple

New book – Italy’s Private Gardens

After much debate, and pretty much at the last minute, everybody has agreed on a title for our next book (out in October). There are only so many ways you can combine the ideas of ‘Italy’ and ‘gardens’. Anyway, the layouts are done, the high res files have been sent off, and now we just have to wait and see.

italy's private gardens cover

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